“There is something beguiling about the way the winemaker detective works, and... the telling of it is worth an evening in an armchair.”

"He may be France’s pre-eminent wine expert but we do not see much of the winemaker detective making wine, although he does enjoy a verre or two, and enjoys pondering the wines of the areas he visits.

So, when an old couple in Sauternes are found shot dead in bed it naturally, for Cooker anyway, turns his thoughts to Chateau d’Yquem, its wines and the morning mists that help make them.

The discovery of the bodies is both touching and shocking: lives long lived but for not much money and for nothing worth stealing. Still, the deaths touched Cooker and he is intrigued. And his intrigue gifts us a masterclass on Chateau d’Yquem and the wines of the area... a mouthwatering prospect if it was not for the presence of two bodies, and a seemingly motiveless murder.

He and his assistant, Virgile, break open a probably priceless bottle of 1947 Yquem as a little something to have with their dessert cannelés and, still intrigued by the murders, decide to pop over to Sauternes to learn more.

There is something beguiling about the way the winemaker detective works and, although the story is slight, the telling of it is worth an evening in an armchair." —The Connexion, Feb. 2018 issue

Requiem in Yquem